Make PDF Annotation Timeless

It is great to see Logseq continues to invest in PDFs. Thanks a lot for that.

However, there are still two important features missing (at least for me).

1- Embedding Highlights to PDF file

One of the biggest selling points of Logseq is having our own data. However, this is not the case for PDF highlights because they are not shown in any other apps.

It would be great to know that my highlights will still be with me if I stop using Logseq. So, please embed highlights (and notes of highlights) to PDF itself.

2- Working with already highlighted PDFs

Over the years I’ve accumulated lots of annotated PDFs, and time to time I re-read those PDFs to make connections with other notes/ideas.

Unfortunately, Logseq does not recognize highlights if they are made in any other apps.

It would be great if Logseq would import old highlights (and notes of highlights) as they are made in Logseq itself.

I agree with the second point, but not necessarily the first. I store everything in git and this would cause lots of changes to large files and balloon the repo size. If the first could be made optional, yes.

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No, please no. Just add a option to export a PDF version with embed highlights…

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Agreed, or at least have the choice. Most PDF editors allow you to edit highlights and annotations, and those annotations can be viewed in other PDF editors, so I see where OP is coming from.

Would also love to have the PDF viewer available when a graph is being exported to HTML.

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I think exporting just when “publishing” would be great

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This capacity would be more secure from my point of view. At present, I can highlight text and refer to it in my notes. If something goes wrong with these references to highlights (and I have seen posts on exactly that), it would be great to at least have the highlights preserved.

This would also enhance established interoperability with Zotero, which has its own PDF reader with highlighting and annotations.

Simply, one PDF with one set of highlights and annotations that can be referred to and edited across readers, one of which is Logseq.

I suggest Logseq have an option to refresh/sync its listed highlights and annotations on the relevant page.

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  1. I would like to own my highlights as well.
    However, highlights can be stored separately from a PDF file.
    E.g., as plain ol’ Logseq blocks. Since blocks can have arbitrary data on them in properties, describing on what PDF file they’ve been made and where exactly, plus any more data we may want - who made it, when, possibly a comment.
    A PDF file can be stored separately at a location of your choice, be it a local fs (not that future-proof), a private cloud (a bit more future-proof) or a public immutable cloud (e.g., IPFS) (future-proof as much as it can be).

  2. Import of highlights sounds great.
    However, sources are many and imagine that would require substantial effort from the Logseq team, not giving all that much value in return.
    One way is to have community-maintained importers.
    If we’d have a data model of Logseq highlights as blocks, then we can write importers ourselves, publishing them as plugins.

I highly doubt that. I haven’t come across to a PDF reader that doesn’t import highlights from a particular PDF highlighter. This indicates that every highlighter (hence the reader) uses the same underlying technology.

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That’s a good mention. And indeed there seem to be a PDF annotation spec, which I gather from this PDF annotation import description page of a tool and annotate PDF with JS guide.

Then cost of getting it done seems manageable and value’s way more. +1 for having it as part of Logseq.

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