The road to PKM

Since the advent of the personal computer some teasing products have been offering us a semblance of Personal Knowledge Management, before the term was even thought of.
For me it started with hypertext stacks on the Apple Macintosh Classic, which were clunky at best, then I learned HTML, and used that to structure information, but that just took too long to execute.
Then came the ability to create interactive wordprocessor /spreadsheet combination that lead me into using the Access database management system.
The next stepchange was the wiki, which finally allowed you as a user to create pages on the fly, and radically changed my relationship with my information, also I was able to hold a personal and a business wiki separately, with he ability to cross populate some of the same information in both places.
The problem with most wikis was that a server is needed to set one up, and they don’t install and “just work” on your own pc.
Workflowy was the next move, but the licenced model and the fact that it was on line, plus the arcane tagging system spoiled a great product.
LogSeq is now my PKM tool of choice, you can download it and have it “just work” and the greatest joy, it holds the information locally.
Best of all the ability to link in PDFs and (using the plugin) output PDFs gives me control over sharing information.
I look forward to the future development of LogSeq, and hope that a simple switch on a page can be used for long-form writing.

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Thank you for this historical overview. I think a possible next stage is that you have a complete operating system and I think we see a good attempt with Anytype.io. You can get a good feel here: Intro - Anytype Docs It is still in early Alpha but it is already quite capable (I am an alpha tester). Anytype is local and built on the technology of Web 3.0

And I fully agree that Logseq just works and it is local.

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What about considering Obsidian? Some testing before Logseq choice?
It differs in how we approach note-taking/making. Top-down or bottom-up thinkers. Hierarchical or freebase ones.